It’s Groundhog Day, Again …

The comma placement in this phrase is so. very. important. People really underestimate the importance of the comma.  (Eats Shoots and Leaves – anyone??)

D&D_GroundhogDay.gifI just cannot help myself, I love this movie. I saw it in the movie theater in 1993 when it was released and I was rather on the very pregnant side. I have never been a fan of going to the movie theatre. Too many people (ugh, people) and noise, and icky butter popcorn smell. Nope, not my thing.

I was a little shocked to find out that this is the 25th anniversary of the movie, but … duh, the Boy will be 25 this year too. Lord help me.

I do watch this movie every year, just like I watch the Grinch every Christmas. It is a tradition and while we really don’t have any six extra weeks of winter, um, every, it is still fun to get a sense of what the poor yankees have to deal with.

I will say – we are so very not equipped to deal with any real winter weather in any way. We had to close down streets, I-10, and especially bridges just a couple of weeks ago for ice – again. First time since 2014. So much for global warming. None of this makes sense to me.

That said, Phil has no bearing on our winter at all, but the movie is just so fun and I just can’t help myself. In an odd way, all the strangeness of the movie works and the funny little aside is that the Boy’s middle name is based on one of the actors. Not spelled the same way, but the inspiration was there because he was funny. Nope not Bill Murray. Or Andie McDowell either.

M & M Cookies for Christmas Eve

I have no idea why my mother made M & M cookies for Christmas, but she always did. I love them and make them many more times a year. Usually for Christmas, I just make them with regular M & Ms. I do miss the tan colored M & Ms. Although I get why the blue ones go with the really weird Christmas lights we had. There were red, green, blue, and orange and the bulbs were pretty much huge. So maybe the M & M cookies made sense in a strange sort of way. But blue and orange Christmas tree lights – why?

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1 cup vegetable shortening
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 large eggs
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp table salt
1 1/2 cups plain M & M’s or more as the case may be.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream together Crisco and both sugars. Add eggs, one at a time, and mix to combine. Add vanilla. In a bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, and salt. Add flour mixture to butter mixture in 2 batches, scraping down the mixing bowl as needed. Add M & M’s and stir to combine.  Use a #30 disher to scoop dough onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake 10 minutes or until golden – turning half way through.

10 December 2005
24 December 2011 – apparently the Boy really likes these
25 December 2013 – for the Boy
8 June 2015 – for the Boy for Bonnaroo
14 August 2015
2 April 2016 – Easter – pastel M & Ms
14 January 2017 – 1/2 crisco / 1/2 unsalted butter
22 December 2017 – Christmas M & Ms – red/green; #30 scoop

Pecan Pie – necessary for Thanksgiving

In my family, you always got what you wanted for your birthday meal. That included dessert. In my case it was tacos with corn tortillas and all the fixing and then … guess it, and it makes to no sense at all – pecan pie. I think I might have been a very strange person when you get right down to it. Yeah, I was, and still am, strange. But at this point in life I really do not care anymore.

D&D_2326I have made the recipe for at least five years and possibly more, but I like the idea of making the custard on the stovetop before filling the crust. It is a little bit of extra security in making a pie. The custard is half way there and then you bake – lovely when it is all said and done. And there is the other requirement – the Boy always wants this for Thanksgiving and to be honest, I cannot blame him, because I do too.

1 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup heavy cream
1 Tbs molasses
4 Tbs unsalted butter, cold and cubed
1/2 tsp salt
6 large egg yolks, lightly beaten
1 1/2 cup chopped pecans, lightly toasted – Renfroes
1 – 9 inch unbaked pie shell, chilled in the pie plate for 30 minutes*

Adjust oven rack to second-lowest position and heat oven to 450 degrees.

In a sauce pan, heat syrup, brown sugar, cream, and molasses oven medium heat and stir until sugar is dissolved. Remove from heat and let cool for 5 minutes. Whisk in butter and salt and then whisk in egg yolks until incorporated.

Take pie pan out of the fridge and put the pecans in the pie shell. Pour in the filling and place in oven, but immediately reduce heat to 325 degrees. Bake until filling is set and center is slightly jiggly, somewhere between 45 and 60 minutes. Cool pie on a cooling rack for at least and hour and then set in the fridge for at least 3 hours more, but a day would be better. Bring to room temperature before slicing and serving.

D&D_2342This is lovely gooey in a non cloying way – I think it is the lack of corn syrup. Maple and molasses bring so much depth to the pie. Really do not think I will ever do anything else but this.

*Used a Pillsbury refrigerated pie crust and it worked really well (need to figure out what to do with the other one, hm?). Just make sure you put it in a glass pie pan (Anchor) and put it in the lower 1/3 of the oven. Makes a difference. Oh, and do chill it for 30 minutes. Again, makes a difference.

Source: America’s Test Kitchen or Cook’s Country or whatever – why do they need two names after all. It is just confusing. At least to my little blonde self.

22 November 2017

Cranberry Relish

I really feel like I have been making this for 20-something years, and when I get right down to – that’s not too far off the mark. Yikes. How old am I? Well the other option is not being older (ie: dead), so I will take what I can get. More Cranberry Relish for me and my friends. And not being dead …D&D_2286

I grew up with the cranberry sauce in a can – with the funny little ridges. And do not get me wrong, I loved that stuff. No, really loved it, but this recipe was just such a lucky, fortunate fluke – sometimes you just have to take the wins where you can get them.

So many people think, ugh – horseradish, but honestly. Give it a go – even if you only do a half recipe while the fresh cranberries are on sale (at the Publix). You might just find a new favorite.

Other advantages – keeps well in the fridge for months; is excellent with other roasted meats, esp. chicken and pork; and amazingly good on the obligatory leftover turkey sandwich on white bread with bleu cheese dressing (miss you, Walt). Oh, and good on a cheese plate as well – sweet and sour with a little heat from the horseradish. I have a friend that I make this for that uses it on a peanut butter and “jelly” sandwich. O…kay. I will never do that but I am glad he does and enjoys it. To each his own.

How do I explain the cloves? This recipe is the only reason I buy ground cloves.
Definition – “the dried flower bud of a tropical tree, Syzygium aromaticum, of the myrtle family.” Means nothing, thank you dictionary.com. Oh, and “Food Lover’s Companion,” my go to food bible – again – thanks for nothing. Just spend the money and get the tiny jar of ground cloves. It is kind of like allspice in way – hard to explain, complex, but in this case, very necessary.

2 packages (6 cups) fresh cranberries
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups fresh orange juice
1/3 cup prepared horseradish, just drain it a bit
1/2 tsp ground cloves

Rinse cranberries, removing any that seem suspect. Combine sugar and orange juice in a large saucepan. Heat on medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Add cranberries and mix until the cranberries start to burst. Simmer for a bit. Let cool completely. Mix in the horseradish and the cloves. Refrigerate.  This will keep for months. And that is an excellent thing. Because you never know when you are going to need it. Yes, need it.

Always check the horseradish and cloves before making. Usually, this is when I buy horseradish and cloves for the year. Cloves keep a little better, but you might need to add more than usual, but I have learned my lesson with the horseradish. Unless you have access to a horseradish root (lucky devil), get the freshest prepared horseradish you can – if it somewhere close to local – all the better. This is the time of year, I use horseradish a lot.

11 November 2017 – appetizer potluck at work for sweet potato ham biscuits

D&D_136318 November 2017 – gifts – Sandy, Traci, Joyce, Doug, Tony. Elaine, Josh … etc.

20 November 2017 – Thanksgiving

Cranberries on sale – at the Publix right now – 2 packages for $3. Excellent. I will just keep making this for the next month for sure. There is never enough cranberry relish and never enough friends to share it with.

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Me taking pictures again. Not horrible, but not great either. Rhino in the bkgd.

Source: Since 1998 or so – Southern Living, I think, or maybe not. Who knows at this point, and does it really matter if you’ve been doing it for almost twenty years?

We’re going to have a TV Party tonight. All Right! Or, oops, a Pumpkin Party. Same thing, maybe?

Oh, dear, lord where did TV Party come back from? Black Flag – Henry Rollins – Repo Man. Such an odd thing – yes, odd but funny and strange in the same way the film Raising Arizona is.

D&D_2167Well, every year I go to Scott Novota’s pumpkin party – Strong Street Studio. Just one of those things I save my little money for and then spend ridiculous amounts to purchase two or three blown glass pumpkins. This year for two really beautiful pumpkins I spent $129.00. But this is only my “stupid” waste of my money. I am not a clothes shopper, I do like shoes, but I am just not a shopper – I put it off as long as frigging possible. Right now, I need new jeans, new Keds, and a few lot more long-sleeved shirts, but it is such a chore.  The MotH should be grateful, really. So I do not feel too bad for spending dumb amounts of money on glass pumpkins.

Can’t help myself, but I have this thing for individually blown glass pumpkins. It is because the MotH surprised me for my birthday not long after we moved to Pensacola with a glass blowing weekend class. I have been, for a very long time, a potter – through high schools (every year) and in community college, and then in a community center. Pottery and glass blowing seemed so similar to me, but they are very different, and at the same time a little similar too.

I guess after the glass blowing weekend you realize how difficult it is – especially if you are a female because arm strength is a big part of this job – same for throwing on a wheel, but glass is way heavier than clay. I can attest to that. And dear lord, the rod you have to put the molten glass is not light weight either. Out of my depth.

So I have an appreciation for Strong Street Studio – I would like to apprentice there – much as I would like to apprentice at Au Peche Mignon. I wonder am I too old to do either – and that depresses me greatly. Slightly opposite apprenticeships if you think about it.

My collection – so far. And this. The rest are here.

But this is, by far, my favorite. It just looks so wickedly evil. Never seen one that was its equal. dd_img_0850-edit

Cranberry Relish 

I have been making this relish for a very long time and you either like it or you do not – it is either a horseradish thing, or more likely, a cloves thing. I really do not think there is a middle ground here. I am forever in debt to my lovely mother in law – who is now my only mom for the great gift of lots of serving bowls*. I know I use this one year after year, but it is really beautiful. Indeed. dd_1651

I started making this just after the Boy and I came back from England. And I shared it with a really good friend the first time. Now I share with lots of friends – and that makes me really happy. I am 90% sure this is a recipe from Southern Living Magazine.

2 packages (6 cups) fresh cranberries
2 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups fresh orange juice
1/3 cup prepared horseradish, just drain it a bit
1/2 tsp ground cloves

Rinse cranberries, removing any that seem suspect. Combine sugar and orange juice in a large saucepan. Heat until sugar is dissolved on medium heat. Add cranberries and mix until the cranberries start to burst. Simmer for a bit. Let cool completely. Mix in the horseradish and the cloves. Refrigerate.  This will keep for months. And that is an excellent thing. Because you never know when you are going to need it.

For friends this year:

Traci 
Sandy
Joyce
Elaine
Josh
Tony
Ham

I am on my second batch and I am sure there will be a third batch. I just tell people when your canning jar is empty, let me know and I will fill it up again with cranberry relish. Because this is the time for fresh cranberries.

That being said, frozen cranberries (fresh cranberries that you shuffle off into the freezer), work for this too. No, really, they do. And I do freeze fresh cranberries, because you never know when you want cranberries with horseradish, especially in the summer. Yes, for a summer turkey sandwich with bleu cheese dressing and cranberry relish. That is good stuff.  And Tony says make the sandwich on Hawaiian rolls – I cannot believe I did not think of that before – duh.

* Need to get pictures of all the serving bowls she gave me – they are pretty much amazing.

 

Weyer Works

DSC_6078When we moved to Pensacola in 2003, we had no idea how many festivals take place throughout the year. Because of the climate, we have festivals basically year round. One that we first went to was the Great Gulfcoast Arts Festival which takes place annually in early November, usually the first weekend. There are all kinds of very beautiful things (read: expensive), from jewelry, pottery, wood turning, paintings, photographs, just as you would expect in an art show. In addition to this the GGAF has a space for what it calls Heritage Arts and this tends to be my favorite part of the festival, well, that and the liquid refreshments. Guys serving champs in tuxedos –  cool.
It was at the 2003 Arts Fest that I first met Mr. Weyer. He and his wife are from Iowa and I can understand why they would want to be in Pensacola in November instead of in Iowa. Totally get it. He was hand crafting spoons and other kitchen items out of Iowa hardwood that  has been air-dried for at least seven years.  It was fascinating to watch him make spoons on site, and the spoons were beautiful to hold and seem to fit perfectly for me. So I bought a couple.
I use them all the time, especially when making pasta sauce or working on a chutney recipe. They just feel right when you use them. It is hard to explain if you have never had a hand-made spoon like this. They are balanced, but sturdy.
So it became a thing – go to the GGAF, look at all the art (?) and then buy a couple of spoons from Mr. Weyer and his wife. All of the spoons have the year on the back and Mr. Weyer’s initials on them so for many years I would pick up one or two. The only year we did not was the year of Ivan (2004) because there was no Arts Festival that I remember.
My collection is pretty complete now, but I do stop by and look each year just to see if there is something new that I must have to add to the bunch.

This particular spoon was damaged (chipped and put in the dishwasher – thanks to the Boy) and I took it to Mr. Weyer and said, can you fix it. And of course the answer was, duh, yes. And he did.