Chutney Cream Cheese with Gingersnaps

I have not seen a recipe like this in donkeys’ years. It’s super simple, but has a lot of flavor, if, and that’s a big if, you like these kinds of flavors. To me these are great, and underused, flavors and while the MotH and the Boy both tried this, it was largely left to me to finish. Gee, rough job. I will go out on a limb and say this is not breakfast food though. Afternoon snack, especially with some hot tea, was just lovely.

D&D_2663

16 ounces cream cheese, softened
1⁄2 cup chopped chutney
2 Tbs sultanas (the pretty raisins)
2 teaspoons curry powder
1⁄2 teaspoon dry mustard

Mix softened cream cheese with curry powder and mustard. add the chutney and mix together well. Place in fridge at least 3 hours or overnight.

Serve with gingersnaps.

Source: Genius Kitchen

Carrot & Raisin Salad

I have never made this for Thanksgiving, ever. I made it this because I love it even though I know neither the Boy nor the MotH likes it at all – their loss, more for me. So I made it because there would be other family members at Thanksgiving in case someone other than me might like it too. I do think that worked.

D&D_2329These are random thoughts:

I eat carrot/raisin salad for breakfast – just a couple of days in the fridge and this really is excellent. It keeps so much better than cole slaw. Cole slaw need to be made the day you are eating it and then just toss it out. That is not to say you cannot use the cole slaw mix for days and days, you just have to dress it the day you are going to eat it. This works really well, especially when serving bbq pork or sloppy joes.

Oh, and yes, breakfast because apparently I have to eat meals now. Ugh.

I have no recipe for carrot & raisin salad* – same as with cole slaw.  Let me try to explain. I peel and grate a 1 pound bag of carrots on the large holes of a box grater. Put that in a bowl. Add golden raisins – sultanas, and decided if I need more raisins. Then get out the Duke’s mayonnaise. This is where you must be careful. Too much mayo will make just a hot mess. So add the Duke’s judiciously. A little at a time – a little kosher salt now would be a good thing. Then let the whole damn mess sit refrigerated overnight and decide if you need to add something more. In my case, a couple of days later the salad needed a little more (very little) mayonnaise. Made the difference in my breakfast this week. Indeed.

Carrot Raisin Salad is always for my brother’s birthday. That’s saying a lot. I’ve said this before, probably lots, but for our birthdays growing up you got your favorite meal for your birthday. My brother’s favorite was roast beef with rice and gravy and carrot & raisin salad. Maybe it was the roast beef I made the week before Thanksgiving that made this happen, but no matter what this was a really good treat for me and the others that recognized this** on the Thanksgiving buffet.

Who writes about carrot & raisin salad? No body but me.

*Why is it called a salad – it’s like a carrot slaw with sultanas. Oh, and pineapple-ly things will never, ever, be involved in carrot/raisin salad. Ugh – just so wrong. Yes, I have very strong opinions about food. I think we all do. Well, even if we all don’t, I still do.

**Yes, it was all of us old-ish people, but they enjoyed it. Me, my mother-in-law, my sister-in-law’s mother, and I think my brother-in-law too. Yes, I was looking at plates. Based on what I saw, I think they liked it.

Either way, a great breakfast for a few days at the office.

Cous Cous Salad

Yep, I am so back to my vegetarian days with this recipe. I think that making the orange juice, white wine, butter sauce pasta makes me crave this too. So many similar ingredients and flavors. Although it is interesting that I have not sized this recipe down for just me and therefore I eat it for breakfast and/or lunch for about a week. Now, I use local pecans because the are just so sweet. I know I have written about this before but Renfroe’s pecans are … I am at a loss. They are stupidly, amazing, dumbly, good. I guess because I grew up with pecans from Georgia and did not understand how the season worked, nor how to store them in between that I have learned a lot. Since moving to Pensacola, I now know how local pecans work. It is a charmed world to have such amazing fresh pecans.  Once again – spoiled.

D&D_15561 cup orange juice
1/3 cup raisins or sultanas – I prefer sultanas, but will deal with raisins, easily.
1 red onion minced
1/2 cup toasted pecans (or walnuts), salted
3 scallions, diced
1 cup Cous Cous – (not israeli couscous – I have tried, but not my favorite)
Red wine vinegar
1 Tbs Canola oil

Heat orange juice over low heat until bubbly. Add raisins or sultanas and let simmer until raisins are soft. Heat a small saucepan with water to boil. Add red onions and boil for just a minute and a half. Remove from water into a bowl and cover with red wine vinegar to soak until you are finished with everything else.

Add Cous Cous to orange juice with Canola oil. Remove from heat and cover. Let stand until orange juice is absorbed.

Toast pecans in a skillet with some kosher salt until fragrant. Just about a minute on medium heat.  Dice scallions. Drain red onions. Fluff Cous Cous with a fork and add red onions, pecans, and scallions.

I think next time some blanched asparagus would be a great addition. Or maybe some thawed frozen artichoke hearts – just make it a bit more substantial.

I think this is my goal – to take the things I make over and over again and develop them further, to add another dimension to them. I already have a few ideas for this – may be great – may be an random failure, but it is worth a shot. At least to me.

Maybe some salty cheese. Will have to think about that.

Couscous Salad

D&D_0256

Couscous Salad

Me and Mr. Peabody are in the WABAC machine for this recipe – if it can be called a recipe at all. This is another in a long line of things I made while in my vegetarian phase – if you can call a decade a phase, but that I continue to make because it is just so damn good. I have been thinking of making this for a while now. It uses things that I don’t tend to have on hand, red onion and orange juice.  It is a mix of a lot of strange things, and I could not tell you, have no idea, where the original recipe came from. But somehow all these weird things come together and if I am honest, which I can occasionally be, it is the red onion and orange juice that totally make this for me. Worth that trip to the grocery store – yep. Every time.

1 cup orange juice
1/3 cup raisins or sultanas
1/2 medium red onion, diced
1/3 cup toasted nuts, coarsely chopped
1 scallion, sliced thinly
1 cup couscous
Handful of minced flat-leafed parsley – not totally required really – but pretty much.

Heat orange juice in a saucepan until simmering gently. Add raisins. And let the raisins enjoy themselves.

Toast the nuts in a small pan, stirring often until just fragrant. Coarsely chop.

Place diced red onion in a heat proof glass dish with just enough water to cover. Heat in microwave for about two minutes. Let sit for a few minutes, then drain. Add a splash of vinegar, which ever kind you prefer to the onions.

Turn up heat to a nice simmer on the orange juice, add the couscous with a tablespoon of olive oil. Mix, cover and let sit off heat to steam. Fluff with a fork. Add scallions, red onion, nuts, and parsley and mix to combine.

D&D_0256

Couscous Salad – or something like it …

Notes: I like regular small couscous. I tried it this time with “pearl” couscous, which I think is just a bit too big, too toothy – if that makes any sense, so I went back for the tiny couscous and made it again. Yep – that is what I remember – fluffy couscous with all sorts of weird flavors that really work together. Let it sit over night and it gets even better – no joke. Amazing, flavorful, and really great for breakfast – but I am the girl that likes cold Pad Thai for breakfast too. There it is.