Salted Caramel Snickerdoodles

New in the Christmas Eve cookie/treat rotation – salted caramel snicks. It is basically a thumbprint cookie and you fill the little divot with a home made caramel sauce. Once again, I made the dough, refrigerated it, baked the cookies a couple of days later, again stored in the fridge and made the caramel sauce a day later. Worked out pretty good. Before I went forward with the caramel, I had the Boy test the plain snick and he really like it.

D&D_2523This was really pretty easy to do and when you sort of divide the labour over a couple of days, it is even more so. I like working like this so I can bake/prep a little bit after work each day – gives me some fun without being too terribly stressful. And thinking ahead when baking is always a good thing.

Snickerdoodle Dough:
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon cream of tartar
1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
1 1/4 cups sugar
12 Tbs unsalted butter, melted and cooled
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 large egg, room temperature
4 teaspoons ground cinnamon

Salted Caramel Filling:
1/4 cup sugar
1 1/2 tablespoons unsalted butter, at room temperature
2 tablespoons heavy cream, at room temperature
1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
Flaky sea salt, for sprinkling

Make the snickerdoodle cookies: Line 2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Whisk together the flour, cream of tartar and kosher salt in a medium bowl until evenly combined. Whisk 1 cup of the sugar, the butter, vanilla and egg together in a large bowl until well combined. Pour in the flour mixture and stir with a spoon until the dough just combines.

Stir together the remaining 1/4 cup sugar and the cinnamon in a small bowl. Using a 1/2-ounce ice cream scoop or a tablespoon, portion and roll the dough into 30 (1-inch) balls. Roll each ball in the cinnamon-sugar to coat, and then transfer to the prepared baking sheets, spacing the balls 2 inches apart. Using the end of a wooden spoon or your index finger, press each dough ball in the center to create a deep divot. Refrigerate the dough balls on the baking sheets for 30 minutes.

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Bake the cookies, rotating the baking sheets front to back and top to bottom halfway through, until light golden brown on the bottom, about 12 minutes. Let the cookies cool for 1 minute on the baking sheets, and then transfer them to a wire rack to cool completely.

Make the salted caramel filling: Pour the sugar in a small saucepan and place over medium heat. Cook the sugar, stirring occasionally, until it turns liquid and deep amber brown. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the butter until smooth. Add the cream and kosher salt and stir until incorporated. Fill the divot in each cookie with the hot caramel and sprinkle with sea salt. Let the caramel cool for 30 minutes to set before serving. [I just need to make this again to just eat w/a spoon.]

21 December 2017

Source: Ree Drummond

Brickle bits of Snicks

I think we all love the idea of a recipe that we can make with the things we have on hand. That said, it is so very annoying when you think you have something that you always have on hand – and then you don’t have it at all. Damn it.dd_img_0450-edit

I had that happen tonight. I was making Snicks for a good friend because I remember he liked them and I just knew I had everything. Crisco – check, butter – check, eggs – check, brickle – check, and the rest … sugar, flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, blah blah. Oh, holy crap – why do I not have ground cinnamon. I mean I looked everywhere in the pantry  and nada, nope, nothing. It cannot be a Snick without cinnamon. Thank goodness my dear mother-in-law lives around the corner and she bailed me out. Once again.

I guess I am not as good as putting things on the grocery list as I thought. Although cinnamon is typically one of those ingredients that I order from Penzey’s or the Spice House, but I can manage with grocery store cinnamon. Then I realized I needed to refill my supply of cream of tartar too, and hell, looking around the kitchen I need several other things. I think this just may be the pre-baking season clean up and restock.

8 Tbs of unsalted butter, softened
1/2 vegetable shortening, room temperature
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs, room temperature
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp cream of tartar
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup of brickle bits (Heath’s – it is in the baking aisle)*
2 tsp ground cinnamon
1/3 cup sugar

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Sift together flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt over a piece of waxed paper. In the bowl of a stand mixer beat butter, shortening, and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at a time and beat until incorporated. Add flour mixture in thirds and mix until just combined. Mix in brickle pieces.

Use a #40 disher to make cookies, rounding them in your hands before rolling them in the 2 tsp cinnamon and 1/3 cup of sugar sifted together. Place them on a parchment-lined baking sheets. Bake for 9-11 minutes**, turning half way through. Cool on the baking sheet for a minute and then remove to a cooling rack to cool.

Made 36 cookies.

* If you want this to be easy, one bag equals 1 1/3 cup of brickle pieces. I prefer a bit less so that is why I go for a scant one cup. Your call. But please do not try to store the brickle in the fridge – humidity and brickle does not go well together. I store mine in the pantry in a zip top bag and it has worked out well.

** 9 minutes worked perfectly for us.

Modification of a recipe from Cookie Madness.


Toffee Bit Snickerdoodles


Toffee Snickerdoodles

Snickerdoodles are a pretty perfect cookies. It is unreal that it took until I was grown up-ish to have them. Toffee is always a good thing. Adding them to a cookie I already like, is a great thing. I could go on about this, but let’s just cut to the chase.*

1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
1/2 cup vegetable shortening (Crisco)
1 cup sugar
2 large eggs
2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
2 tsp cream of tartar
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 1/3 cup (8 ozs.) Heath bits
2 tsp ground cinnamon
3 Tbs sugar

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Sift together flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, and salt over wax paper. It is just a thing I do with dry ingredients. I think sifting is important.
Beat butter, shortening and 1 cup sugar in the bowl of a stand mixer until fluffy.
Add eggs. one at a time; mix thoroughly.
Gradually add flour mixture to the butter mixture, beating until well blended. But don’t over do it.  Stir in toffee bits.
In a small bowl, mix 3 tablespoons sugar and the 2 tsp cinnamon together. Shape cookie dough into 1 1/4 inch balls – how do you measure that?, roll in sugar-cinnamon.
Set onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake 9 to 11 minutes or until lightly browned around the edges. Cool slightly then remove from cookie sheet.

Notes: Once again have no idea where this recipe came from (until I did a photo search), but am glad that my friend Zach said these are his favorite cookies I’ve made ever. Making notes – I’ll make this recipe for him for Christmas – just for him.

*So I had to look up “cut to the chase” – apparently it means a western movie thing – just cut to the chase because we don’t want to hear dialogue  – cut to the exciting part – the chase. I get it, but it is anti-climatic in a way. I thought it would be, well, more interesting.

I’m pretty sure this is from Cookie Madness, a favorite site of mine. It’s kind of funny, sometimes when I look for a source for a recipe (if I haven’t written it down), I do it by photos. My brain works much better in the visual world than in the world of words. Odd, since I enjoy writing as well, but for me, the visual brain is so much stronger.

2015 Butter Usage (by month – September)


Pecan Pie Cookies

2 September 2015 – 2 Tbs – Cheddar Orzo, but with Cheddar instead of Gruyere.

4 September 2015 – 12 Tbs – Pecan Pie Cookies

4 September 2015 – 10 2/3 Tbs – Oatmeal Cookies

6 September 2015 – 8 Tbs – Peanut Butter Cookies

11 September 2015 – 10 2/3 Tbs – Oatmeal White Chocolate Cranberry Cookies

11 September 2015 – 5 1/3 Tbs – Magic Bites

18 September 2015 – 16 Tbs – Sugar Cookies

18 September 2015 – 8 Tbs – Snicks

19 September 2015 – 12 Tbs – Sour Cream Pound Cake

30 September 2015 – 12 Tbs – Nutty Chocolate Chip Cookies

Total 96.65 Tbs = 12.08 sticks = 3.02 pounds

All in cookie form apparently. Guess I’m keeping my friends happy. However, I need to expand my butter usage to include something that might resemble dinner. Or not.


Okay, this is going to come as a great surprise. I have never had or made a snickerdoodle until the first time I made them in 2009. Not sure how I missed this bandwagon, but I did. Completely. My mom never made them and I’d love to be able to ask now if she even knew what they were, but I can’t, and I’m betting she had no earthly idea.

When I made these in 2009 both the Boy and the MotH really liked them. I think it is because they are not too sweet. Neither are huge on sweets, unless you count the Boy’s thing with M&M cookies – can’t say I blame him though.




2 3/4 cups all purpose flour
2 teaspoons cream of tartar
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup butter, softened
1/2 cup shortening
1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1/4 cup sugar
2 tsp cinnamon

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cream of tartar, baking soda and salt; set aside.

In a large bowl, cream together butter, shortening, and sugar until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs, one at a time, then beat in vanilla. On low speed, gradually beat in flour mixture (or stir in by hand) until well combined.

In a small bowl, mix together sugar and cinnamon.

Shape spoonfuls of cookie dough into 1″ balls, then roll in raw sugar/cinnamon mixture.  Place 2″ apart on ungreased (parchment-lined, if you prefer) cookie sheet and bake for 8-10 minutes.  Remove to a wire cooling rack.  They will be slightly puffed when removed from oven but will flatten completely as they cool.  Store in an airtight container.

Yield: 5 dozen cookies

Recipe Notes: For softer, chewy cookies, take the cookies out of the oven at 8 minutes (or maybe earlier depending on your oven). For crisp cookies, allow them to bake longer.  If you like an extra spicy cookie, add extra cinnamon to the sugar mixture (some recipes call for a ratio of 2 tablespoons sugar to 2 teaspoons cinnamon).  Save the leftover cinnamon/sugar for cinnamon sugar toast. But butter will be involved.  Yep.

This is from one of my favorite blogs Pinch My Salt. I really like finding out what Nicole is up to – you never know and to me that’s the best kind of cooking blog. I think I may have to get out of my cookie rut, but somehow I don’t think that’s going to happen any time soon. There is nothing wrong with a rut as long as you are enjoying yourself. In my opinion, anyway.