Sour Cream Cornbread

This is my go-to recipe for cornbread. Again, another recipe from a friend that I have been making for years. It is so damn good I take leftover, if there are any, to work for breakfast – split it open, toast it in the toaster oven and cover it in Kerry Gold Irish butter.  One of the best breakfasts, um, ever. Sometimes I gild the lily and add some extra-sharp cheddar before the toasting.

D&D_2683Now I must make this for the upcoming week at work.

That said, this is what I make to go with chili. I want the cornbread in the bottom of the bowl and chili on top with some extra sharp cheddar, scallions or chives, and sour cream. Oh, and a squeeze of lime never hurt this party.

1 cup self-rising cornmeal (you can make this if you just have plain cornmeal)
2 large eggs
1 small can of cream corn – I use Publix brand, it is really good.
1 cup sour cream
1/2 cup canola oil

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Spray a 9×9″ baking dish with cooking spray. Combine all ingredients, mixing well. Pour into pan and bake for 20 – 30 minutes. You will know it is finished when it starts to pull away from the side and the bottom is slightly brown (that is, if you are using a glass baking dish).

Source: Dawn Randle Jennings

Butter Cookies

I am a huge fan of butter cookies. They are simple, but they really need to

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Butter Cookies – with raw sugar

be done well. It is this alchemy of butter, sugar, flour, and a smidge of salt. Simple is best in this case – if you ask me, but the ratio and baking time/temp have to be spot on.

A butter cookie, a well made butter cookie, is excellent with tea. I guess that’s why the English do butter cookies so well. I’m guessing both things are in their DNA. Speculation on my part, but …

1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1/4 tsp salt
3/4 cup unsalted butter, softened (1 1/2 sticks)
1/4 cup plus 2 Tbs sugar
2 tsp heavy cream
3 Tbs turbinado sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift together flour and salt over a piece of waxed paper

Beat sugar and butter together until pale and fluffy. Add the flour mixture in 3 batches until batter just comes together. Gather clumps together on a lightly floured board and kneed a time or two until smooth and in a 1 1/4 inch log – two logs is easier. Chill in plastic for at least an hour.

Cut chilled log into 1/4 inch slices and place about 1/2 in apart on parchment lined baking sheet. Brush with cream and sprinkle a good bit of turbinado sugar on top.

Bake cookies for 12 – 15 minutes, turning half way through until edges are pale golden. Cool on sheet for a couple of minutes and then move to a wire rack.

Dough logs can be chilled for up to three days.

16 April 2006 – Easter w/ W&J vvv – 1/2 w/added lemon juice/zest from 1/2 lemon

17 December 2006 vvv – SR loves these

24 December 2007

21 December 2008 – juice of 1/2 lemon

6 January 2016 – made dough, as is,  and put in fridge, baked on 8 January 2016

This time a year ago-ish – apple turnovers –  https://deftanddaft.wordpress.com/2015/01/10/apple-turnovers-chausson-aux-pommes-apple-slippers/

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Recipe Keeping – sometimes this is a pain (PITA)

How do you keep recipes? Just wondering. No pictures today, but just wondering what other people think. If you would be so inclined to respond.

I tend to print recipes (and write all over them) and keep them in several binders, then I also have a drive with folders and some are on Evernote and some on my old blog. Some I just know by heart and need nothing to make them – there are many of those. I just spent two evenings last week sorting through recipes (new and old) and along the way, I edited – looked at each recipe and think “Will I ever really make this?” Lots ended up in the recycle bin which makes me feel bad and I need to edit earlier in the process – like before printing in particular. And killing more trees. Ugh.

I wish I could develop a system that truly works for me, but using cookbooks, family recipes that I know by heart, a few magazines, recipe “ideas” (with no step by step instructions), and things found on the recipe sites I trust, and of course, other blogs. How are you supposed to keep it all straight?

My first blog and this one were a way to keep up with things, but sometimes it gets a bit out of hand. I wander around with a stack of recipes I want to try – just printed, pulled from binders, etc. Trying to make them fit into the right time of year makes it even more difficult. Ugh. I’m supposing this is a complete first world problem, but I’d like to have a set of things to pass down to the Boy and his future wife (hope I like her) and their kids. Otherwise, why are we here? You get my genetics by default, but I’d love for you to know the recipes that come from different people in our family.

Such as my spinster (yep, they used the word) Aunt Rhodie’s chow chow recipe. She was really my great aunt, my grandmother’s sister and was partially deaf (seems mostly like when she wanted to be – that’s what my grandma always said) and never married but lived with my grandmother and grandfather, but she could totally rock the chow chow.  Now the recipe makes gallons so I’ll have to down size it to make it manageable, but is it worth the effort? I believe it is. Especially when you put it on some black-eyed peas – my favorite way to eat it. Otherwise black-eyed peas – kind of meh. Interesting the only reason I have the recipe is because my mom asked for it. This was my father’s aunt, but my mom appreciated it – probably because it could get me to eat black-eyed peas if for no other reason. I don’t remember my mom ever making it. Can’t blame her. Why do that when Aunt Rhodie would do it for us? Just get a few jars from the basement of the house – which also held the washing machine – clothes were dried on the line.

So to me, family recipes are important. I honor my mom by wanting to make things that she appreciated. I honor my great-aunt Rhodie by loving (and hopefully next summer), making her recipe. And I hope one day, I will teach the Boy how to make home made mac and cheese (he’s never had the boxed stuff – thank you very much), baked beans, sloppy joes, chili, squash pickles, and maybe even hot pepper jelly – and I could just go on and on … family recipes. I still have so much to do and I hope above hope to have plenty of time to do it.