Sweet Potato Fries – just an unhealthy relationship

D&D_SweetPoFries

Sweet Potato Fries – a total addiction.

For the last three four weeks, I have had an unhealthy relationship with sweet potato fries. First, it should be noted that I really like them but, I never make them at home. My first experience with them was several years ago at one of my then favorite, now closed, restaurant – Jerry’s Cajun.* They served sweet potato fries as a side, but they had some cajun spice on them so they were sweet from the potato and salty and spicy from the seasoning – a great combination.

Most places I know serve them with a sweet mixture that includes cinnamon, but to me that is just overkill. Sweet on sweet is pretty boring.

So, we were a Shaggy’s several weeks ago and I ordered sweet potato fries after confirming that there would be nothing sweet put on them. Now ketchup should have nothing to do with a sweet potato fry, so I was trying to think what might be good and spicy with them and it struck me – remoulade. Shaggy’s makes their own sauces/dressings, etc., so I asked for that and it was amazingly perfect together.

Thus my slow descent into eating sweet potato fries for lunch the last three several weekends. And here we are on a Wednesday and I’m thinking about them again.

I may have to break down and beg the chef at Shaggy’s for the remoulade recipe and sort out how to make sweet potato fries at home. But somehow that would take the fun out of it.

* Jerry’s Cajun had, by far, the best roast beef & gravy po boy in Pensacola. It rivaled my NOLA favorites.
This was also the first place I had boudin — one of my favorite foods – such a favorite we took an entire trip to the area around Lafayette La to eat it at every place we could – including gas stations. But that is another story entirely. But a good story all the same.

The Battle of New Orleans

The Battle of New Orleans (on Chalmette Plantation) was the last major battle of the War of 1812 on January 8, 1815.* 200 hundred years now and a victory for Andrew Jackson (5,000 soldiers defeated 7,500 British). And it kinda, sorta, took place in New Orleans-ish, but, really it took place in a part of Louisiana that most people had never heard of until Hurricane Katrina – Chalmette, Louisiana. And maybe not then either really, unless you are from the North West Gulf Coast (FL, AL, MS, LA).

We know it because when the Man of the House went in for S&R (Search & Rescue) after Katrina (2005) –  they were the first S&R group into Chalmette. The area was devastated thanks to the Mr. Go – an example of all the things that go wrong when we, humans, try to control nature (read: stupid & not good).

Read this –  not all of our Independence happened in the New England area –

http://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/battle-new-orleans-birthed-american-democracy

And if you are really brave listen to Johnny Horton – The Battle of New Orleans (you tube it). It’s pretty silly, but you get the idea. I remember this from when I was young, but  I didn’t understand what it was about.

*I’m getting all Jane Austen on this – between Mansfield Park (May 1814) and Emma (December 1815).