Bundt Pan problem – redux.

Dear lord, I do understand that I have too many bundt pans, but when you are a real Southern baking woman, can that really be true? Or are you a real baker? In my head, that is a no. Never too many bundt pans and never too many recipes for pound cake either. This is one of my William-Sonoma Gold Touch Pans. They are just too amazing. The bake is great – not too dark and not too light. They say they are non-stick-ish, but I never trust that and spray with baking spray, especially to get in the corners and what nots of these pans.

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All my Williams  Sonoma bundt pans are from Nordic Wear – a made in America company that has been around for ages and a day – since 1946. This one is the heritage bundt pan based on the German design of the kugelhopf. To be honest, this is one of the simplest of the bundt pans that I have, but it is one of my favorites.  It still is rather architectural and looks good with a simple bit of confectioners’ sugar on it.

Hey – look at that – I spelled confectioners’ right the first time – slightly amazing.

Buttermilk Chocolate Chip Bars

So when I buy buttermilk to bake something I try to find other things to make with what is left. I know, I know, you can freeze leftover buttermilk, but I never seem to do it.

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Buttermilk Chocolate Chip Cookie Bars

 

It is funny I do not remember my mom making anything with buttermilk – really nothing. Not even biscuits and that is strange for a Southern woman. I do not have it on hand all the time, but most of the time.

Most recently, I have used buttermilk in Savory Herb Muffins and in Basil Sun-Dried Tomato Mozzarella Bread, and of course, Lemon Buttermilk Cake with Lemon Glaze which was the original intent of the buttermilk purchase. And now another recipe with just a bit of buttermilk in it.

In the grand scheme of things, it is kind of a test. What can you do with it, and make it different. Not just cake or biscuits or whatever – try to make a variety of things. I am sure the next time I have buttermilk (like now) homemade ranch dressing will be in my future as is often the case in the spring. And that always means spinach and mushroom quiche. One of my favorite things ever and a recipe I have had since before the boy was born – way before.

2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp salt
8 Tbs unsalted butter, room temperature
3/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup brown sugar
2 Tbs canola oil
1 large egg, room temperature
1/4 cup buttermilk
1 1/2 tsp vanilla
1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips
1 cup roughly chopped pecans (Renfroe’s, of course)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 9 x 13 inch baking pan*, spray with baking spray and line with parchment and spray again.

Over a piece of waxed paper, sift together flour, baking soda, and salt. In a bowl of a stand mixer, cream together butter and both sugars. In a small bowl, crack egg, add canola oil, vanilla, and buttermilk. Add flour a little at a time. Stir in chocolate and pecans.

Spread dough, it will be thick, into pan making sure to get dough all the way into the corners. Bake 30 – 35 minutes until center is set and the edges are golden. Cool bars in pan and the cut into bite-sized pieces with a plastic knife because you do not want to jack up the pan with a metal knife.

Source: Baking Bites – one of my favorite baking sites. Must, at some point, figure out how many recipes that I have used from this site. I think there will be several.

* Love William-Sonoma Gold Touch Pans – they really are the best. Thank you America’s Test Kitchen for showing me how amazing these pans are. They really live up to all the hype.

Butterscotch Brownies – basically, Blondies

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Butterscotch Chocolate Blondies

I have always had an affinity for blondies. I guess it is because it is a nice mix of cookie dough w/chips and, honestly, it is dead simple – no batches of cookies, only turning the pan once – simple and done. Now the Boy is a blondie fan so I try to make things for him that I think he will enjoy and – again – dead simple. I guess that may mean I am kind of lazy.

I do love butterscotch. I am well aware the butterscotch chips are, truth be told, not real, but as America’s Test Kitchen says – sometimes you just need a butterscotch chip to have the right butterscotch flavor. Improving the world through chemicals – sounds so 70’s and slightly mostly creepy, but this recipe is pretty much, um, great.

This time I made them, I added a few semi-sweet chocolate chips just … well, just because I had some left from another recipe and it seems to work pretty dang well.

1/2 pound unsalted butter, softened (16 Tbs)
1 3/4 cup packed light brown sugar – I always use light brown sugar
1 Tbs vanilla – yeah! Not may recipes call for this much, but I never measure strictly. More is better. Kind of like chocolate or cheese.
2 large eggs
2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 1/4 cup butterscotch chips
1/3 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Preheat over to 350 degrees. Grease a 9 x 13” baking pan. I still have a preference for William-Sonoma (RIP Chuck Williams) gold-touch baking pans. They are beyond words my favorites and I am slowly replacing everything I have with them.

Sift together, over a piece of waxed paper, flour, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.

Cream together butter and brown sugar until fluffy (someone needs to define “fluffy”). Add eggs, one at a time and then mix in vanilla. Add flour mixture to butter mixture and mix until smooth. Stir in 1 cup of butterscotch chips and all chocolate chips.

Spread dough in pan and smooth. Top with finally 1/4 cup butterscotch chips (and a handful of chocolate chips if you are so inclined). Bake for 30 – 40 minutes or until they begin to pull away from the edge of the pan and a toothpick comes out clean.  Cool in the pan and then cut into bite-sized pieces.

24 December 2009

15 February 2014 – for Em. vg not too dense – try adding a bit of chocolate

19 December 2015 – for sharing at the holidays with friends.

I think this may be my new favorite Blondie. It is really good. And I think that may be the mix of the chips, but it is probably it is the tablespoon of vanilla. Yep, that may be it.

Lemon Lemon (Lemon) Loaf – or triple lemon cake, if you prefer

This recipe originally made two 9″ x 5″ loafs, but since I only have one 9″ x 5″ pan which is perfect for my mom’s banana nut bread and the other one is 8″ x something,  I decided to just half the recipe and deal with it. This, therefore, is for one loaf. I have to say I love my loaf pans – they are the Williams-Sonoma gold touch and pretty much amazing. I totally recommend them, no, really – I have no dog in this fight. They are far and away the best baking pans. Baking so evenly and made in the USA – that’s right – just like my Nordic Ware – which are bundt pan magic.* I just keep adding to my gold touch collection – 2 9″ round cake pans, 9″ x 13″ baking pan, and the list goes on. Hey W&S, please send me the 12 cup cupcake pan just because I’m kind of nice (sometimes), well not really. D&D_IMG_0825-Edit

This is one of the softest cakes I’ve ever made. The texture is so light that it seems etherial. It is great plain, but outstanding with syrup and glaze. It makes a great breakfast – hardly surprising, I know.

I like to bake for others, but sometimes, like this, I just want to make something I think I will like. And that usually means lemon-something. Can’t help it. But I did share this around and I think it was well received.

3/4 cup cake flour
3/4 cup all purpose flour
1 tsp baking powder
1/8 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 cup + 2 Tbs sugar
4 large eggs, room temperature
zest of two good sized lemons
1 oz freshly squeezed lemon juice
2 sticks unsalted butter, melted and cooled
1/4 cup sour cream, room temperature
1 tsp vanilla extract

3 Tbs lemon juice
3 Tbs sugar

1 cup confectioners’ sugar
2 – 3 Tbs lemon juice

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Spray 9 x 5″ loaf pan with cooking spray. Line with parchment and spray again.

Sift flours, baking powder, baking soda, and salt over a piece of waxed paper.

Put eggs, sugar, lemon zest, and lemon juice in a food processor and pulse until combined. With food processor running, drizzle the butter through the feed tube. Add the sour cream and vanilla and pulse to combine. Transfer to a large mixing bowl.

Sprinkle the flour mixture, one third at a time, gently fold. Do not overmix. Add batter to loaf pan, and bake for 20 minutes. Rotate pan, reduce oven to 325 degrees and bake for 30 – 35 minutes more or until toothpick comes out clean. Cool in pan for 15 minutes.

In saucepan, heat lemon juice and sugar over medium heat until sugar dissolves. Heat for a few more minutes until it thickens just slightly. Remove from heat and cool slightly [saying slightly quite a bit].

Line a sheet pan with parchment and invert loaf onto pan. Using a skewer, poke holes into top of loaf. Brush top with lemon syrup. Let soak into the cake. Let cake cool completely, at least 30 minutes.

In a small bowl, whisk together confectioners’ sugar and 2 Tbs lemon juice. Should be thick, but pourable. Pour the glaze over top and let it drip down the sides. Let lemon glaze harden, about 15 minutes.

D&D_IMG_0830-EditSoaked unglazed loaves will keep wrapped in two layers of plastic and frozen for up to 6 weeks.

Glazed loaves will keep for 3 days, wrapped tightly in plastic wrap, at room temperature.

I think they get better after the first day.

16 October 2015

This is a half recipe of the original from Epicurious from Baked: New Frontiers in Baking. The food processor part of this really surprised me, but it did work.

*I will not even go into how many Nordic Ware bundt pans I have. I think it might be not natural. But I still love them!