Butterscotch Cookies

Why not take a recipe in which the methodology works and just switch up the flavors? I had no white chocolate chips – which was slightly astonishing, but I had an abundance of butterscotch chips  (no surprise at all) and also this is one of my favorite kinds of cookies to make: mix one day, chill, and then bake another day. These need to chill and I have always done that overnight, mostly because I can be (a little) lazy, but it has always served me well in the cookie department. I do think cookies benefit from a bit of a rest.
Next time, I may add some local Renfroe‘s chopped pecans to the mix – yes.

D&D_21061 cup unsalted butter, room temperature cut into 2 Tbs pieces
3/4 cup sugar
1 tsp table salt
1 tsp light corn syrup
1 Tbs vanilla
2 large egg yolks
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 cup butterscotch chips (or more, maybe, um, yes, quite a few more)

Do the usual thing: In a stand mixer, cream butter, sugar, salt, corn syrup, and vanilla until light and creamy. Add yolks, one at a time, beat until blended.

On low speed, add flour, scraping the sides and bottom of bowl. Stir in butterscotch chips. Divide dough and roll into log about 2 inches in diameter. Wrap each roll in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight. Go for overnight in my experience.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment. Slice cookies into 3/8~ inch slices and arrange 1 inch apart on the sheet – they do not spread at all. Bake until edges just beginning to brown, about 13 minutes. Cool on pan 2 minutes, then remove to cooling rack.

Source: Based on Shirley Corriher‘s recipe for lemon white chocolate chip cookies. I first “met” Shirley on Alton Brown’s show Good Eats. I love her Southern accent and am largely intimated by her use of science when it comes to baking (she’s a real scientist from Vandy). Science was never my strong suit at all. She’s just a hoot and I am a huge fan. Even though the science throws me at every turn.  This one goes out to the one I love. 

~Have no idea how to measure what 3/8 inch slices is. I am just not good with math, um, at all. Ever. Or, as noted above, science. Sigh. Just make sure the slices are similar.

 Lemon White Chocolate Chip Cookies 

I never thought this recipe made any sense. I love lemons, I know that is astonishing to everyone that reads this. But I am not a huge fan of white chocolate, or any chocolate –  for that matter …. but these cookies really work in an amazing way. It makes stupid sense. And science is involved. Cool.

We can all thank Shirley Corriher* for this recipe. And we won’t even go into her biscuits – they are heaven. I guess why they are called “Touch of Grace” biscuits. They are pretty much amazing. Another amazing recipe that kind of makes not too much sense, but is sublime. dd_1648

1 cup unsalted butter, cut in 2 Tbs pieces, room temperature 
3/4 cup sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp light corn syrup – science
1/2 tsp lemon extract
zest of one lemon
2 large egg yolks – science, you’ll see
2 cups all purpose flour, spooned and leveled
1 cup white chocolate chips

In a stand mixer, cream butter, sugar, salt, corn syrup, lemon extract, and lemon zest until light and creamy. Add yolks, one at a time, beat until blended in thoroughly.

On low speed, add flour, scraping the sides and bottom of bowl. Stir in white chocolate chips. Divide dough and roll into log about 2 inches in diameter. Wrap each roll in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Cover baking sheet with parchment. Slice cookies into 3/8 inch slices and arrange 1 inch apart on the sheet. Bake until edges just beginning to brown, about 13 minutes. Cool on pan 2 minutes, then remove to cooling rack.

*Shirley Corriher is a scientist after all. Really, a biochemist from Vanderbilt. Holy hell. That is pretty much amazing. I first saw her on AB’s show – Good Eats  – that great Southern lady with the short grey hair and all the answers and so many science facts that it kind of scared me a bit.

But then I realized she had written two cook books. Cookwise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Cooking, and also Bakewise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Baking. But I fell in love with this recipe long before I knew of her cookbooks.

The Boy loves the recipe and asks me to make it on a regular basis and I completely understand. While you might think it is odd, as I first did, it comes together in, sigh, and amazing way. And who does not love a slice and bake cookie? They are pretty much my favorite kind of cookie. Yep.

Cheddar Stuffed Mushrooms

It is, to me, really nice to find a recipe that I haven’t made in a while that really stands the test of time. I made this the first time over 8 years ago. Had set it aside for 6 years for no particular reason – just didn’t think to make it and a few weeks ago I had some stuffed mushrooms at an event and thought, Why haven’t I made any of these lately? No particular reason.  So I looked through the recipes I had and noticed all my notes about this recipe – things like, “easy” and “vg” (my shorthand, thanks to Bridget Jones’s Diary — the book, very good), and that both the MotH and his father liked it. So I thought what the hell, but let’s see if we can prep one day or so ahead and bake the day I wanted them. I know they are good warm or room temperature. Most stuffed mushrooms are – they are forgiving if nothing else. Notes of how to do this ahead of time below – dead simple. D&D_1060

1 lb button or crimini mushrooms, or a mix of both- this time crimini
5 Tbs unsalted butter / divided / 3 & 2
1/2 cup walnuts, chopped fine
1/2 cup fresh parsley, minced
1 small onion, minced
1 shallot, minced
1 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese
1/2 cup finely fresh bread crumbs – 1 slice of bread whirred in the food pross monster*
Salt / freshly ground black pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees – if you are baking immediately.

Wash mushrooms**, let dry on paper towels. Remove stems and finely chop them.

Finely chop walnuts and parsley and add to a medium bowl. Mix in bread crumbs and cheese. Season with freshly cracked black pepper.

Heat 3 Tbs of butter on medium and add onion and shallot. Sauté for a few minutes. When aromatics are starting to get soft, add mushroom stems and a nice pinch of salt and cook until liquid is release and the pan begins to dry just a bit. Let cool.  Add cheese / bread crumb mixture.

Here is where I deviated a bit and hopes it works – update – it did. I put the mushroom caps in a zip top bag with a couple of paper towels and plan to hold them there for a day and a half. I let all the stuffing pieces come to room temperature and then refrigerated it to stuff the mushrooms for Christmas Day appetizer.

The plan is to put the mushrooms on a baking dish, brush the with butter as in the original recipe then fill them or stuff them,  as it were, with the cheese mixture. Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.  Serve warm or room temperature.

Source: No earthly idea – long before I started keeping up with those sorts of things. Or blogging about food.

—–

Update – So took the stuffing mix out of the fridge for about 30 minutes. I did put the mushroom caps on a rimmed baking sheet lined with foil and filled them pretty well, but totally forgot to brush with butter. It was not a problem at all. That step, in my opinion, can be skipped unless you just want to do that.

* Had not thought of this phrase in ages. When I used to make things in the food processor, I would prepare the Boy by saying I was about to use the food pross monster. How that, in and of itself, didn’t scare him, I don’t know, but the noise didn’t bother him because he knew it was coming. That was my sad little 4 cup food processor, but it did what I needed at the time. Things you forget.

** AB says it is okay to rinse mushrooms. And I do it and have never had a problem with it. Just rinse them in a colander and dry them on paper towels.

Christmas Eve 2007 – SR / WR liked, very easy

16 August 2008

10 May 2009 – Mom’s day w/ W & J

25 December 2015  – v.g.

 

Searching for … My Mom’s Meatloaf

Lunch Box NFL American Conference

My 2nd grade lunchbox

One of my favorite things when I was a kid was a cold meatloaf sandwich with ketchup – in my NFL lunchbox. Yep – I was that girl – or that tomboy.  I had the best NFL lunchbox in second grade. I think the boys were really pretty envious.

Just ask me – which helmet meant which city – I could tell you and the team name. Who was the quarterback? Totally got that. And could tell you a few other fun facts. Hello boys from the 1972 Miami Dolphins. Daddy raised me right. At least for me he did – I’m pretty sure he wanted a boy – duh. The lunchbox choice was all mine though.

Back to meatloaf. I do not remember caring for it at dinner, but for a left-over sandwich, it was nothing less  than sublime. Why is it most kid memories seem that way? I guess it’s just a filter that you didn’t know you had.  Nonetheless, I’ve been searching for my mom’s meatloaf – not because I want to eat it when I make it, but I want it the next day in a sandwich with soft white bread and some form of ketchup.

This time I looked at 6 meatloaf recipes I have on file. They are All-American Meat LoafMartha Stewart’s Meatloaf.  Turkey Meatloaf from Trisha Yearwood (but honestly, I would pretty much never use turkey). Cracker Barrel MeatloafMeat Loaf by Ina Garten who I adore, by the way, and AB’s meatloaf.

I have made the All-American meatloaf before, but not by following the actual recipe – no surprise there – in January of this D&D_0862year, and again in February. The right kind of weather is necessary for meatloaf. It is not spring or summer food. October, yeah, that seems like meatloaf weather. It really was good and here is the mixture of these six recipes along with the things I know to be true.

1 medium carrot, finely grated
1 small yellow onion, grated
4 Tbs fresh parsley, rough chopped
1/4 Parmesan, finely grated
2 slices white bread, torn into pieces
1/4 cup milk
3 Tbs ketchup
3 cloves garlic, minced
2 large eggs, lightly beaten
1 1/3 pound ground chuck

3 Tbs ketchup
2 Tbs yellow mustard
1 Tbs Worcestershire
2 Tbs brown sugar

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Grate the carrot and onion into a large mixing bowl. Add parsley and Parmesan. In a medium bowl, place the torn bread and milk until the bread has soaked up all the milk. Add to the large mixing bowl. Add ketchup, garlic and eggs. Mix until combined. Add the ground chuck and mix with your hands until just together.

Line a baking pan with aluminum foil and mold meatloaf into shape on baking pan. Bake at 350 degrees for about 30 minutes.  Meanwhile, mix together ketchup, mustard, Worcestershire and brown sugar.  After 30 minutes is up top with glaze and bake until the internal temperature is 160 degrees. Let cool

I don’t bake this in a loaf pan – that just seems yuck to me (and to Alton who I learned the trick from), especially when using ground chuck. The only problem I have with this is it does not hold together well, but I don’t want to add more eggs or binders. I had a friend tell me to use oatmeal, so I may try that – or one of the other binders, dry bread crumbs, or saltines. Worth a try. But the flavor of this, for me and the MotH, was pretty damn good. Oh, and I made a little more glaze – using the same ratios – and put it on the bread for the sandwiches – very very good. Next time though, I make simmer the glaze a bit to let it reduce and meld together a little more.

Is it my mom’s meatloaf? Not quite, but getter closer and better every time.

 

2015 Butter Usage (by Month – August)

1 August 2015 – 3 Tbs – Peanut Butter Fudge
1 August 2015 – 8 Tbs – Peanut Butter Cookies

6 August 2015 – 2 Tbs – Everyday Orzo
6 August 2015 – 2 Tbs – Rutabega

7 August 2015 – 16 Tbs – Ghirardelli Chocolate Chip Cookie

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Peanut Butter Fudge – AB

14 August 2015 – 8 Tbs – Peach Cobbler

15 August 2015 – 16 Tbs – Blueberry Cookies

19 August 2015 – 2 Tbs – Peach Clafoutis

20 August 2015 – 2 Tbs – Gruyere Orzo (again)

22 August 2015 – 3 Tbs – Rice Krispy Treats
22 August 2015 – 8 Tbs – Gruyere Crackers
22 August 2015 – 16 Tbs – Lemon Sour Cream Cookies

28 August 2015 – 16 Tbs – Peanut Butter Fudge  – AB

Total 102 Tbs = 12.75 sticks = 3.1875 pounds

Finally, a respectable number. Damn Skippy!!

Peanut Butter Fudge – AB

So I made my friend Amy’s peanut butter fudge that was her Grandmother’s recipe a couple of weeks ago. It was good, but I saw this recipe from Alton Brown which seemed easier and needed (gasp!) no candy thermometer and only used the microwave. Nice for the summer, if you ask me.

D&D_0408

Peanut Butter Fudge – Alton Brown

I had taken Amy’s first batch to split between work friends and other friends, but had had a request for it again which gave me the perfect opportunity to try AB’s version. I trust AB implicitly. I used his roasted turkey recipe for the first time I ever made the whole Thanksgiving dinner – that is how much I trust him.

Because it is still scorching hot here – it is only early September after all, basically, still friggin’ summer – I stored this in the fridge, but it can be left out at room temperature, I was being cautious.

Peanut Butter Fudge
Alton Brown

8 ounces unsalted butter, plus more for greasing pan
1 cup smooth peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 pound powdered sugar

Combine the butter and peanut butter in a 4-quart microwave-safe bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Microwave for 2 minutes on high. Stir and microwave on high for 2 more minutes. (Use caution when removing this mixture from the microwave, it will be very hot.) Add the vanilla and powdered sugar to the peanut butter mixture and stir to combine with a wooden spoon. The mixture will become hard to stir and lose its sheen. Spread into a buttered 8 by 8-inch pan lined with parchment paper. Fold the excess parchment paper so it covers the surface of the fudge and refrigerate until cool, about 2 hours. Cut into 1-inch pieces and store in an airtight container at room temperature for up to a week.

Notes: I really like the texture of this fudge. It was very creamy. It went over very well, especially with The Boy. That always makes me happy. It is funny neither he or I like “real” fudge, but we both like this. One warning: it is sweet enough to make your teeth hurt. Small price for great flavor and texture. Just make the pieces really small. That helps.

Lemon White Chocolate Butter Cookies

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Lemon White Chocolate Butter Cookies

This recipe is from Bakewise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Baking by Shirley Corriher. I first “met” Shirley on Alton Brown’s show Good Eats. She is, of all things, a biochemist. I’m not entirely sure what that is.

I do love all things lemon, but this just sounded like a weird combination – lemon and white chocolate? But, I trusted Alton and, by extension, Shirley. Also she was totally charming on Good Eats. I won’t go into the science in this except to say that, I don’t understand it, and it just works amazingly well.

1 cup unsalted butter, cut in 2 Tbs pieces
3/4 cup sugar
1 tsp salt
1 tsp light corn syrup
1/2 tsp lemon extract
1 Tbs grated lemon zest
2 large egg yolks
2 cups all purpose flour, spooned and leveled
1 cup white chocolate chips

In a mixer with a paddle attachment, cream butter, sugar, salt, corn syrup, lemon extract, and lemon zest until light and creamy. Add yolks, one at a time, beat until blended in thoroughly.

On low speed, add flour, scraping the sides and bottom of bowl. Stir in white chocolate chips. Divide dough and roll into log about 2 inches in diameter. Wrap each roll in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight.

Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Cover baking sheet with parchment. Slice cookies into 3/8 inch slices and arrange 1 inch apart on the sheet. Bake until edges just beginning to brown, about 13 minutes. Cool on pan 2 minutes, then remove to cooling rack.

21 December 2008 – bake about 12 minutes, vvg, great flavors  – slightly surprising; went over well at the office – need to make more.

2 January 2009 – 325 degrees for 13 minutes = perfect

18 January 2009

2 February 2010 – 325 degrees 13 minutes

25 August 2012

7 March 2015 – took some to work and to Shaggy’s.

Think I may make them just a bit too much? Nope. It is a strange (odd) recipe, but it totally works.