M & M Cookies – the best ever.

Okay – best M & M cookies ever. My mom always made these for Christmas, I am not sure why, but I tend to make them year round. I guess it just one of those things I make to make the Boy happy at anytime of the year – and, yes, it really does seem to work. I think I need picture of him eating them, but do not expect he will allow that at all.

D&D_20831 cup Crisco
1 cup brown sugar
1/2 cup granulated sugar
2 tsp vanilla
2 large eggs
2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp table salt
1 1/2 cups M & M’s, plain or peanut, but no – do not do peanut – just saying

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cream together Crisco and both sugars. Add eggs, one at a time, and mix to combine. Add vanilla. In a bowl, sift together flour, baking soda, and salt. Add flour mixture to butter mixture in 2 batches, scraping down the mixing bowl as needed. Add M & M’s and stir to combine.  Use a #30 disher to scoop dough onto a parchment-lined baking sheet and bake 10 minutes or until golden – turning half way through.

D&D_iPhone_image6I am not sure what else there is to say about this recipe that I have not said before. I keep Crisco in the fridge just for this recipe because I love it so much. Maybe it is just a reminder of my mom, but at the same time it is a really good cookie recipe too.

I am guessing it is a bit of both. Yep, it is.

 

Aged Gouda Orzo

I have become a huge fan of orzo. Thanks to Cutting Edge of Ordinary’s Everyday Orzo. This was just such an enlightening experience as I have mentioned many (many) times. But I liked the concept, so here is a version that I tried based on the cheese in the fridge. I expect I will try this multiple times with multiple cheeses. Not surprising really. I do love about all cheeses.  Well, I cannot think of any cheese I do not like, nope.

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2 Tbs unsalted butter
Small yellow onion, diced
2 cloves garlic, minced
8 ozs orzo
2 1/2 cups vegetable stock, warmed (microwave works)
8 ozs aged Gouda shredded

Melt the butter in a saute pan and add the onion and let it soften, then add garlic and stir in for about a minute. Add the orzo and stir until coated in the butter mixture. Add the vegetable stock and bring the heat up to a boil. Then turn down the heat to a simmer and cover the pan – leave it covered for 25 minutes. If you lift the lid you will mess this up.  You are letting the orzo steam and then you shall add the cheese. And it will be a glorious mess of orzo, alliums, and cheese. Which to me is just breakfast on a work day.

I seasoned with a good bit of freshly ground black pepper, because I am me.

Penne with Sun-Dried Tomato & Cantal

Another no-recipe recipe – some night cooking, which is something I do quite often, for work lunches for the week. I would have liked to have some cream for this, but to be honest, I managed pretty well with out it. Although, some mascarpone might have been excellent. D&D_2073

I was just trying to make something that I would like with what I had on hand and here is how it went. Again not going to the grocery store at this point in the evening – which was about 11pm, or so.

8 ozs penne pasta – one of my favorite pasta shapes – always use this for mac n cheese*
4 Tbs unsalted butter
1 medium yellow onion, diced (or a shallot?)
8.5 ozs sun-dried tomatoes, packed in oil, but drained (save the oil!)
8 ozs Cantal cheese, grated on the large holes of a box grated
zest of lemon
Parmesan, finely grated

In a big pot, heat water to boiling with a really big handful of kosher salt. Cook penne until al dente.

In a sauce pan, heat butter over medium heat and add onions and saute until soft, but not browned in any way.  Add the sun-dried tomatoes and simmer for a bit, just to make sure they are really soft – this is key.

Add the cooked pasta and blend together. Remove from heat and add the Cantal, a semi-hard cheese from France that is slightly similar to a Cheddar. Specifically from Auvergne region of central France. Fancy French Cheese – always good.

Once the cheese is all melty, serve in a bowl with a bit of lemon zest (always a good thing with a cheesy pasta in my opinion) and a little bit of fresh Parmesan for that salty goodness.  The ratios are yours to decide.

This made great leftover lunches for about a week. And the Boy made a strange version of it for dinner one night – with eggs. I’m still not sure I understand that at all.

*no elbows for me.

Chocolate Chocolate Chip Cookies 

Well, I did not make these cookies for me. I made them for The Boy, even though he’s working out at the gym to lose his supposed beer belly and this “doesn’t help.”

Either way, it’s a different kind of cookie for me – a chocolate on chocolate cookie. And again, I like a cookie you can make one day and bake the next or a day later or so. Or whenever.D&D_2069

Oh, and I used duck eggs for this. Woo hoo!

2 cups flour
1⁄2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 tsp. baking soda
1 tsp. kosher salt
16 Tbs unsalted butter, softened
1 cup granulated sugar
1⁄2 cup packed light brown sugar
2 eggs
1 tsp. vanilla extract
2 cups chocolate chips (mixture of semi-sweet, milk, and/or white – whatever)

Whisk together flour, cocoa powder, baking soda, and salt in a bowl; set aside.

In the bowl of a stand mixer, beat butter and sugars until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a time, add in vanilla. Add dry ingredients, and mix until just combined; stir in chocolate chips. Roll cookies into 4-ounce balls and place on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet about 4-inches apart. Refrigerate for 4 hours or up to overnight.

Heat oven to 350°. Bake cookies, rotating once halfway through, about 15 minutes. Cool slightly before serving.

Seems like a bit of work for 12 cookies. Not sure how this is going to go. 

Source: Saveur

Another complaint… about other peoples’ recipes. Ugh. Or language in general.

I have certain things that bug me about the way some recipes are put together. They are little annoyances, but they just get under my skin – a lot. Yes, a lot. So maybe not so much of a ‘little’ annoyance.

Titling your recipe as such, “Creamy Chicken Pasta Casserole Recipe.” Recipe is not necessary there. At. All.  It is implied. Please do not do this. It makes my brain hurt.

Wasting space by saying “ingredients” before the list of things needed to make the recipe. I really think that is self explanatory. Also, drop “procedure” or “method.” That should, again, be self explanatory.

Numbering the steps of a recipe.  Again, do things in the order they are listed – we don’t need numbers. We are not in kindergarten any more. Nope.

Describing what you are about to do – especially in bold, and then just telling us how to do things. See:

To make the crust: Pulse together …… etc.  Ditch everything before, and including,  the colon. Just tell me what to do without telling me what you are about to tell me. That is just damn stupid.

Can we see I have a problem? Yes.

We will not get into the problem I have with grammar in general, or maybe I will. This past year in particular it was “gifting.” Please shoot me. It almost as bad as “signage.”

Gift is a noun – not verb, even if Victorians used it as a verb on occasion, that is not excuse because I am pretty sure most people did not know Victorians used the word that way. You give someone a gift. You do not gift them anything. It just sounds ignorant.  I am pretty fucking sure the Victorians also did not have “signage.”  Another stupid word that does not exist in the real world. Yes, I also know how quotes work.

Wow, this rant has gone on for way more than I expected. But it makes me feel pretty good. Sweet. But the sad thing is, I could just go on for about ever about stupid grammar things.

And I think that makes me a prig. But, truth be told, I know I can be a prig when it comes to grammar and language. Well, enough said. Perhaps.

 

 

 

Manchego Crackers

So I had Manchego and had to figure out something to do with it. I buy cheese like that – buy it and then figure something out. Improvisation or some such. Manchego is sheeps’ milk cheese from Spain – from the La Mancha region. I guess this is the sheep milk cheese cracker. I am a big fan of sheeps’ milk cheeses, and goats’ milk cheese, and cows’ milk cheese. Well you get the idea. Fan of cheese is all possible variations.

This is a new recipe to me – so here we go.

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6 tablespoons cold unsalted butter, cut into ½-inch pieces
3⁄4 cup all-purpose flour
1⁄2 teaspoon salt
1⁄8 teaspoon cayenne
2 ounces Manchego cheese, finely grated

Place all ingredients in the bowl of a food processor, and pulse just until a dough forms. Do not overwork dough, or crackers will be tough.

Roll dough into a log about 1.5 inches in diameter (is that the right word for round-ish? – don’t know). Refrigerate. I usually just refrigerate overnight just to be safe and it seems to work well.

Preheat oven to 400° F. Slice dough into rounds about 1/4 inch thick and place on baking sheet lined with parchment. Dock the crackers with a fork. Bake in middle of oven until golden, about 10 minutes. Allow crackers to cool on the baking sheet for about 5 minutes, then transfer them directly to a cooling rack to cool.

Store crackers layered between sheets of wax paper in an airtight container at room temperature up to 4 days.

Adapted from Epicurious. Via http://lifecurrents.dw2.net/manchego-crackers/

~Original directions: Gather dough into a ball, and flatten into a 5-inch disk. Wrap dough in plastic wrap, and chill dough, until firm, about 30 minutes. The dough can be made ahead and chilled like this for up to 2 days.

Roll out dough on a floured surface with a floured rolling pin until about 1/8-inch thick, roughly 14-inch round.

Working quickly, cut out rounds with a 1 ¾ to 2-inch floured biscuit cutter, and arrange the rounds ½-inch apart on a silpat or parchment paper covered baking sheet. Re-roll scraps (but only once or they will get tough; chill first if soft), and cut out more rounds. Prick each round 2 or 3 times with a fork.

If your kitchen is warm, roll out dough between 2 sheets of wax paper.

~ Notes: I really hate rolling out crackers, or cookies for that matter. Let’s just keep it simple. I did the same thing with Scottish Sharp Cheddar Shortbread just last week. I’ll be damned if it doesn’t work. At least, I’m two for two right now and I shall just keep going. I guess my exception is my favorite sugar cookies. I am not sure how they could be made any other way – but that does not mean I am not open to trying something new.